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 Explore the various services we offer to help you cope with ongoing pain.

Acupuncture is a health science, which is used to successfully treat both pain and dysfunction in the body. Early Chinese physicians discovered the existence of an energy network traversing just below the surface of the skin, which communicates from the exterior to the internal organs and structures at over 1,000 acupoints on the body. This energy works in harmony with the body’s circulatory, nervous, muscular, digestive, genitourinary and all other systems of the body. When this vital energy becomes blocked or weakened, an effect in a body system or anatomic location becomes evident. Stimulation of one or a combination of key acupoints on the body may restore harmony to the affected area. Acupuncture is a principle, not a technique. There are many ways to stimulate an acupoint other than a needle. Many practitioners use electronic stimulation, laser beam or pressure massage to treat an acupoint. The principle of acupuncture does not change, only the technique.

How does it work?

The human body’s energy flow courses over 12 meridians or channels that are normally well balanced. If a disruption of energy flow exists, it can alter the entire system, producing pain or symptoms in the body. Correction of the balance corrects the problem. This is acupuncture’s goal – to restore normalcy to the body’s energy balance by utilizing a combination of acupoints located on the 12 meridians. This is accomplished by a variety of means, the needle is just one.

Is Treatment Painful?

One would assume inserting a needle into the skin would be painful. However, four acupuncture needles can easily be inserted into the hollow tube of a hypodermic needle. Most people compare the sensations to less than that of a mosquito bite. A phenomenon referred to as “Tehchi” occurs when the energy is contracted. This sensation is felt as mild to heaviness or tingling.

How many treatments are needed?

The number of treatments depends on the individual and the condition. Obviously chronic problems will require more treatment than acute ones. In some instances, patients experience an immediate improvement after the initial treatment, while others may not notice until additional treatments are complete. We encourage you to be patient with the healing process. Patients generally see some benefit of acupuncture in 10-12 visits.

What conditions can be treated?

The following is a partial list of conditions in which acupuncture has been effective: acute and chronic pain relief, migraine, tension, cluster and sinus headaches, trigeminal neuralgia, bladder dysfunction, insomnia, cervical (neck) pain, and low-back (lumbar) and mid-back pain, shoulder pain, tennis elbow, post-operative pain relief, gastric problems, asthma, allergies, skin conditions, hemorrhoids, abnormal blood pressure, fatigue, anxiety, neurologic syndrome, neuropathy, etc.

Chiropractic procedures are performed by our Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. David P. Leone. A thorough medical history is taken and the doctor performs a physical exam. He will explain your diagnosis and develop a treatment to address your specific problem. He utilizes manipulation or adjustments of the spine and extremities to restore proper joint motion and function. He may also use physical therapies such as: specific exercises, electrical modalities or nutritional advice to assist in your treatment plan and your return to health.

What Conditions does chiropractic treat?

Chiropractic is probably most associated with treating conditions of the spine, but most injuries to the muscles, bones or joints may respond to chiropractic care. Research has found chiropractic to be effective for conditions such as sprains/strains, arthritis, disc degeneration and herniations as well as tendonitis. Many people have found relief of their headaches with chiropractic care. Feel free to talk with our chiropractor to see if your problem might respond to chiropractic care.

How long will it take for chiropractic to help me?

Response to treatment will vary depending on the severity of your condition and how long you have had your problem, but most people will get some relief in 2-4 weeks.

What is ongoing chiropractic care?

Once you are feeling better with chiropractic care, you will be given personalized home exercises to keep you feeling well. However, sometimes due to severe conditions and very physical jobs, people may require more regular, ongoing chiropractic care on a maintenance basis.

What are the benefits to chiropractic care?

Relief from pain, improved range of motion and more restful sleep are some benefits that patients have experienced with chiropractic care. A recent study found that 85 percent of people suffering from lower back pain found pain relief and improved mobility after undergoing chiropractic care. If you have a history of stroke, hypertension, joint replacement or a bone weakening disease, let your doctor or medical staff know. Certain diseases may cause your doctor to modify your treatment plan. Other conditions such as pregnancy and pacemakers are important information to disclose to your doctor.

EMG (electromyogram) assesses the electrical activity of the muscles and NCV (nerve conduction velocities) assess the condition of the nerves.

Why is my Doctor ordering the EMG/NCV?

Your doctor is ordering this test to assess the condition of your muscles and nerves, which will assist in determining a diagnosis and treatment.

How is the test performed?

Small electrical shocks are administered to the nerves in the arms and/or legs, and then a very thin needle is inserted superficially into the muscles. The test may be a little uncomfortable, but most people tolerate it without any difficulty. The average testing time is anywhere from 20-45 minutes, depending on the complexity of the problem.

Is there anything else I should know?

If you are taking blood-thinning medications (coumadin, aspirin, etc), you may experience a little bleeding/bruising. Please make sure to alert your doctor if you are taking these medications. You may take prescribed pain medications. We ask that you do not wear any lotion on the body parts being tested. You may experience mild soreness in the tested muscles for a few days after the procedure. Please let your physician know if you have a pacemaker.

An epidural injection is an injection of a steroid and/or anesthetic into the epidural space, which is the area in the spinal canal that surrounds the spinal cord and the nerves coming out of it. There are three types of epidural injections used for pain control: caudal injections (through an opening in the tail bone), interlaminar injections (through the middle of the back) and transforaminal injections (along the opening in the sides of the spine where the nerve roots exist from).

Why are these injections done in a diagnostic imaging setting?

All spinal injections are done on an outpatient basis and are performed under fluoroscopic (X-ray) guidance in order to ensure proper placement and to maximize safety and comfort.

What is the purpose of the epidural steroid injection?

The injection allows us to place a steroid next to an inflamed nerve to attempt to reduce the inflammation and/or swelling of the nerves and make them more resistant to mechanical irritation and improve blood flow to the area. This may reduce pain, tingling and numbness caused by the irritated nerve.

How long does this injection take?

Typically, the actual injection takes a few minutes, from 5-10, but expect to spend 45 minutes to an hour at our facility due to preparation and evaluation time.

What are the risks of epidural steroid injections?

With all injections, there is a risk of infection, bleeding, temporary increase in pain and injury to the structures along the course of the needle. Through sterile equipment and technique, we minimize the risk of infection. The risk of bleeding is minimized by discontinuation of blood thinners (this typically require approval from the prescribing doctor) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (except Celebrex). By using x-ray guidance (fluoroscopy) we minimize risk of tissue injury to structures along the course of the needle. Nerve irritation is minimized by the use of local anesthetic 1 percent lidocaine to provide temporarily relief that typically wears off after 1-2 hours. The steroid medication can take 3-5 days to take full effect, so patients may have increased soreness for a few days after the procedure.

How long does the medication work?

The local anesthetic (lidocaine) starts working in a few minutes and wears off after a few hours. The steroid can take up to 3-5 days to start working and its effects can range from no benefit, benefit for a few days, weeks, months or years. Most patients have good initial relief. In some patients, this pain relief will be lasting, while in others there may be some wearing off of the beneficial effect within weeks or months. However, in the majority of cases, wearing off is only partial and the patient may be left with lasting partial pain relief. We consider these injections successful if a series of three injections can provide relief for six months or longer.

Who should not have this injection?

If you have an active infection, poorly controlled hypertension, diabetes, congestive heart failure or are unable to stop blood thinners, you may not be a candidate for this injection.

What is a facet joint injection?

What is a facet joint injection?

A facet (zygapophyseal) joint injection is an injection of local anesthetic and steroid into the small joints of the spine. Typically, there are 4 joint associated with each vertebral level.

What is a medial branch block?

Facet joints are innervated or ‘supplied’ by nerves called ‘medial branches.’ These nerves carry the pain signals from the facet joints to the brain. A medial branch block places a local anesthetic and steroid along these nerves to block pain signals from the facet joints.

What is the purpose of facet join injections and medial branch blocks?

These injections are typically ordered for patients who have pain primarily in their back coming from arthritic changes in the facet joints. These injections can serve a diagnostic role by identifying whether a patient’s pain is coming from the joints of the back. If injection of an anesthetic medication into the facet joints or along the medial branches causes the back pain to go away, then the injection was diagnostic in identifying the source of the patient’s back pain. If the steroid medication injected provides long-term benefits, then the injection served a therapeutic role. If only short-term improvement is seen with facet or medical branch injections the patient then may benefit from radiofrequency ablation of the medial branches.

How long does the injection take?

Typically, facet joint and medial branch blocks take a few minutes to perform, from 5-10 minutes, but expect to spend 45 minutes to an hour at our facility dues to preparation and evaluation time. For radiofrequency oblation, the procedure time is approximately one hour.

What are the risks of facet injections and medial blocks?

With all injections, there is a risk of infection, bleeding, temporary increase in pain and injury to the structures along the course of the needle. Through sterile equipment and technique, we minimize the risk of infection. The risk of bleeding is minimized by discontinuation of blood thinners (this typically require approval from prescribing doctor) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (except Celebrex). By using X-ray guidance (fluoroscopy) we minimize risk of tissue injury to structures along the course of the needle. Nerve irritation is minimized by the use of local anesthetic to provide temporary relief that typically wears off after 3-6 hours. The steroid medication can take 3-5 days to take full effect, so patients may experience increased soreness for a couple days after the procedure. For radiofrequency ablation, there is a risk of nerve damage from lesioning other nerves; to minimize this risk, sensory and motor stimulation are performed to insure placement of the probe is along the medial branch and is not coming into contact with other nerves.

What should I do after the procedure?

You must have someone drive you home. We advise patients to take it easy for the remainder of the day and resume regular activities as tolerated the next day.

Who should not have this injection?

If you have an active infection or are unable to stop blood thinners then you may not be a candidate for these types of injections.

What is a facet joint injection?

What is a facet joint injection?

A facet (zygapophyseal) joint injection is an injection of local anesthetic and steroid into the small joints of the spine. Typically, there are 4 joint associated with each vertebral level.

What is a medial branch block?

Facet joints are innervated or ‘supplied’ by nerves called ‘medial branches.’ These nerves carry the pain signals from the facet joints to the brain. A medial branch block places a local anesthetic and steroid along these nerves to block pain signals from the facet joints.

What is the purpose of facet join injections and medial branch blocks?

These injections are typically ordered for patients who have pain primarily in their back coming from arthritic changes in the facet joints. These injections can serve a diagnostic role by identifying whether a patient’s pain is coming from the joints of the back. If injection of an anesthetic medication into the facet joints or along the medial branches causes the back pain to go away, then the injection was diagnostic in identifying the source of the patient’s back pain. If the steroid medication injected provides long-term benefits, then the injection served a therapeutic role. If only short-term improvement is seen with facet or medical branch injections the patient then may benefit from radiofrequency ablation of the medial branches.

How long does the injection take?

Typically, facet joint and medial branch blocks take a few minutes to perform, from 5-10 minutes, but expect to spend 45 minutes to an hour at our facility dues to preparation and evaluation time. For radiofrequency oblation, the procedure time is approximately one hour.

What are the risks of facet injections and medial blocks?

With all injections, there is a risk of infection, bleeding, temporary increase in pain and injury to the structures along the course of the needle. Through sterile equipment and technique, we minimize the risk of infection. The risk of bleeding is minimized by discontinuation of blood thinners (this typically require approval from prescribing doctor) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (except Celebrex). By using X-ray guidance (fluoroscopy) we minimize risk of tissue injury to structures along the course of the needle. Nerve irritation is minimized by the use of local anesthetic to provide temporary relief that typically wears off after 3-6 hours. The steroid medication can take 3-5 days to take full effect, so patients may experience increased soreness for a couple days after the procedure. For radiofrequency ablation, there is a risk of nerve damage from lesioning other nerves; to minimize this risk, sensory and motor stimulation are performed to insure placement of the probe is along the medial branch and is not coming into contact with other nerves.

What should I do after the procedure?

You must have someone drive you home. We advise patients to take it easy for the remainder of the day and resume regular activities as tolerated the next day.

Who should not have this injection?

If you have an active infection or are unable to stop blood thinners then you may not be a candidate for these types of injections.

Manipulation under sedation allows your doctor to perform deep stretches and spinal manipulation that would be too painful without sedation. MUS can be very effective and most patients find relief with three 5-10 minute procedures. It is a noninvasive procedure designed to treat chronic and acute conditions such as neck pain, back pain, joint pain, muscle spasms, shortened muscles, fibrous adhesions and scar tissue surrounding the spine and other joints. MUS is performed by specially trained and licensed physicians certified in the technique.

What is the importance of sedation?

It is difficult for your doctor to manipulate injured areas without causing more pain. Sedation allows your physician to manipulate and stretch the affected area more aggressively, stopping muscle spasm cycles, relaxing muscles to break up scar tissue and adhesions and stretching shortened muscle groups.

What are the benefits of MUS?

MUS MUS breaks up scar tissue and adhesions surrounding the spine and joints which can be commonly caused by injuries or previous back surgeries. It decreases chronic muscle spasms, stretches persistent shortened muscles, tendons and ligaments and relieves pain from damaged intervertebral disks.

Is MUS right for you?

Because adhesions and scar tissue can build up around spinal joints and surrounding muscles, certain people don’t find meaningful results from traditional therapies. Often, the damaged area is too sensitive to allow adequate treatment to the area while awake. Physical therapy, chiropractic, and back surgery that doesn’t address the built-up scar tissue may not permanently relieve your pain. If you’ve undergone traditional treatments for 6-8 weeks with little or no improvement, consider MUS before facing surgery risks.

If you’ve been coping with pain that limits activities, consider the benefits of MUS.

What is it neurostimulation?

Neurostimulation (also called spinal cord stimulation – SCS) is a therapy that has been recommended by doctors for over 40 years to relieve chronic pain and improve quality of life. Neurostimulation systems are FDA-approved or cleared for the management of chronic pain in the back, neck, arms or legs.

Who may be a candidate for neurostimulation?

Only a doctor or pain management specialist can determine if a patient is a candidate for neurostimulation. Typically, a good candidate for neurostimulation is someone who has experienced one or more of the following:

  • chronic pain in the back, neck, arms, or legs that lasted longer than expected
  • neuropathic pain (marked by burning, tingling, or numbness)
  • little or no relief from surgery or other treatment options, such as pain medications, nerve blocks, TENS, or physical therapy

How does neurostimulation work?

Neurostimulation interferes with the transmission of pain signals. With this therapy, a small implanted system (similar to a cardiac pacemaker) is used to replace pain with a different feeling. Some people describe this feeling as a gentle massaging sensation or, in some cases, simply the absence of pain.

What are the potential risks and complications associated with neurostimulation?

The placement of a neurostimulation system does require a surgical procedure, which exposes patients to certain risks. Complications such as infection, swelling, and bruising are possible. Additional risks such as undesirable changes in stimulation may occur over time. Be sure to talk to your doctor about the possible risks associated with neurostimulation.

Physical Therapy is administered by a Licensed Physical Therapist (LPT) or a physical therapy assistant (PTA). Physical therapy (PT) can be both passive and active. Passive therapies involve the application of ice/heat or electrical modalities to reduce pain and muscle spasm. Active physical therapy may consist of stretches for tight joints or strengthening exercises for weak muscles. Your therapist may also review proper body mechanics to help prevent reinjury.

What conditions is Physical Therapy effective for?

Physical Therapy has been found to be effective in the treatment of a whole host of disorders of the bones, muscles and joints. From muscle sprains/strains to herniated discs to all sorts of arthritis, PT has helped many patients reduce pain and live productive lives. Feel free to meet with one of our Physical Therapists to see if our program can help you.

How long will it take to see a benefit from PT?

The benefits from PT will depend on the severity and length of time of the problem. Most people get some positive result from PT in 2-4 weeks. If your problem is very chronic or serious, it may take longer to see significant results. For example, rehabilitation for low back surgery may take several months to achieve maximum benefits.

What is ongoing PT care?

Once you are feeling better with physical therapy, you will be given personalized exercises and recommendations to keep you feeling well. Once you are done with physical therapy in our office, you are not completely done with physical therapy! It is important to incorporate the exercises and treatments that you learn in PT into your daily life in order to prevent further injury and to continue to strengthen the affected body part. Our therapists will make sure you leave PT with a home exercise program that should be done regularly.

What are the risks and benefits of Physical Therapy?

Relief from pain, improved range of motion and more restful sleep are just some benefits that patients have experienced with physical therapy. A recent study found that 85 percent of people suffering lower back pain found pain relief and improved mobility after undergoing PT care. If you have a history of stroke, hypertension, joint replacement or a bone weakening disease or any other medical disorder, please let your therapist know so that your treatment plan can be modified accordingly.

What is spinal decompression?

Spinal decompression is a non-surgical, non-invasive, traction-based therapy performed in order to help treat for conditions such as herniated discs, sciatica, spinal stenosis, and facet syndrome. Decompression is performed in the comfort of the office and may be combined with other treatments such as injections, physical therapy, chiropractic adjustments and/or acupuncture.

How do decompression therapy sessions work?

For the typical patient, decompression is completely painless and quite comfortable. Your physician will determine the number of sessions needed and a treatment plan uniquely tailored to your needs. Research shows the majority of patients will respond positively in 10 visits. Each treatment is patient specific and usually lasts only a few weeks.

What is the Kennedy decompression technique (KDT)?

This method of decompression is only performed by a licensed and credited professional. The KDT is specific to the patient’s individual needs. KDT contains a specific decompression evaluation and classification for your pain. It is not a “one-size-fits-all” approach. One of the major differences is that KDT contains a specific rehabilitation program designed to the patient’s back weaknesses and dysfunction along with the latest decompression program.

What makes decompression therapy so effective?

Decompression therapy is most effective when performed in the office with proper controlled mechanical traction that is preprogrammed in order to meet the patient’s needs. Through proper treatment, the injured discs are gently stretched apart. This creates suction inside the disc. Through this vacuum-like effect, oxygen, nutrients and other healing substances are drawn back in creating a healthier disc and allowing healing to begin. This disc treatment is combined with Active Therapeutic Movement, or ATM, which rehabilitates and “wakes up” the core, stabilizing muscle of your spine.

What are trigger point injections (TPI)?

TPI are injections of numbing medication into a muscle to relieve or lessen the pain caused by a trigger point (TP).

What are TPs?

A TP is an area of hyperactive muscle or muscle spasm. A TP can be caused by an acute injury, such as a car accident or work injury, or due to a chronic overuse injury, such as poor posture or repetitive motions. TPs can refer pain to other areas of the body and mimic pinched nerves.

How do TPIs work?

The anesthetic, or numbing medicine, is injected into the muscle to numb it and the needle is then used to mechanically deactivate the TP.

What conditions are likely to respond to TPIs?

Areas of the body that are painful due to muscle tightness or spasm – low back pain, neck pain, etc. – commonly can be lessened or relieved with TPIs. Many times, pinched nerves are misdiagnosed TPs, caused from injured muscles.

How many TPIs will I need to get relief from my pain? How long will relief last?

TPIs are usually at least somewhat effective after 1-3 injections. Depending on the severity of the injury and/or problem, TPIs may need to be given periodically to achieve ongoing relief. Sometimes if the trigger point is severe, a steroid may be added to your injection, but this is not done on a regular basis. TPIs are most effective when combined with physical therapy in order to strengthen the muscle once the TP has resolved.

What are the risks and benefits of TPIs?

Risks include, but are not limited to: reaction to the medication, damage to local tendons or ligaments, post-injection soreness and temporary weakness/numbness in an area remote from the injection, infection, bleeding, bruising and pneumothorax. If steroids are used, side effects related to this medication could also occur. Please talk with your doctor if you have any concerns about these risks. In general, TPIs are tolerated very well.

What is a Genicular Nerve Block?

A Genicular nerve block is a procedure where three distinct nerves are anesthetized (“blocked”) with local anesthetic injected through small needles. The procedure is performed with live x-ray guidance (fluoroscopy) to ensure proper needle placement. It generally takes 5 to 10 minutes for the procedure.

Who is a candidate for a Genicular Nerve Block and why do we do it?

Patients with chronic knee pain that has failed to respond to conservative care may be candidates for a genicular nerve block. There are many potential nerves that can transmit the pain signals from the knee, the genicular nerves represent a few of those. A Genicular Nerve Block is performed to ascertain whether or not a person’s chronic knee pain is carried by the genicular nerves.

What can I expect from the procedure?

The patient is on his/her back with the affected knee slightly bent. Sterile soap is used to cleanse the sites for the block. Local anesthetic is then injected through a very small needle to numb the skin where the procedure is going to occur. Three small needles are then placed with live x-ray guidance. Once the needles have been placed in the proper position, a small amount of local anesthetic is injected through each needle to numb the genicular nerves. The needles are then removed and the patient is brought to the recovery area. The local anesthetic that was injected to numb the genicular nerves last for 3 hours. It is VERY IMPORTANT for the patient to pay strict attention to how his/her typical knee pain responded to the injection for the first 3 hours directly following the procedure. The patient should be ACTIVE immediately following the procedure to accurately ascertain the degree of relief he/she is experiencing while the local anesthetic is in effect. If there was significant relief experienced immediately following the nerve block, the patient is likely a candidate for radiofrequency ablation of the genicular nerves at a future visit.

Radiofrequency Ablation of the Genicular Nerves

The purpose of doing radiofrequency ablation to the genicular nerves is to provide long-lasting relief for chronic knee pain.

Who is a candidate for radiofrequency ablation of the Genicular Nerves?

A patient who responded with significant short-lived pain relief from the genicular nerve block is most likely a candidate for radiofrequency ablation.

What to expect from the procedure.

The set-up for the patient is exactly the same as with the genicular nerve block. Special needles are placed after numbing the skin to the same sites with live x-ray guidance. The needles are connected to a machine that will produce heat at the needle tips after the area is numbed. The heat produced by the machine will provide the same degree of relief the patient experienced from the genicular nerve block, with the lasting 6 to 12 months. The procedure takes about 20 minutes to perform. It can take up to ten days to see the effects of the procedure.

The sphenopallatine ganglion is a collection of nerve cells located just under the tissue lining the back of the nose. By applying a local anesthetic to the area, nerve impulses can be temporarily blocked, providing relief for patients who suffer from frontal migraines. Patient will undergo a series of blocks, 1 each week for 4 weeks. We use a new minimally invasive approach, using the SphenoCath, to perform the procedure on our patients.

What is a sphenopalantine injection?

Sphenopalantine injection therapy has been recommended by doctors since 1908 for the treatment of headaches.

Who may be a candidate for this injection?

Only a doctor or pain management specialist can determine if a patient is a candidate for this injection. Typically, a good candidate for this injection is someone who suffers from headaches at least 4 days per month and who are on medications to control headaches.  

Types of headaches best treated with this therapy include:

  • chronic migraine
  • medication overuse headaches (rebound headaches)
  • tension headaches
  • cluster headaches
  • daily persistent headaches

How does the sphenopalatine injection work?

This is a weekly injection that is given intranasal over four weeks (one injection every 4 weeks). The injection consists of lidocaine, a local anesthetic. You may drive yourself to this appointment. First you will be asked to lie down on an exam table and a cotton tipped applicator will be inserted into your nose that has a topical anesthetic on it. You will lie like this for ten minutes. Next the provider will place the sphenopalatine catheter into each nostril and inject lidocaine. This targets the sphenopalatine ganglion region breaking the headache cycle. You may feel that medication may make your nose run, but this is only for 30-60 seconds.

What are the potential risks and complications associated with the sphenopalatine injection?

Complications such as slight nasal bleeding or worsened headaches may occur. Be sure to talk to your doctor about possible risks associated with sphenopalatine injection therapy.

The use of Botox (onabotulinumtoxin A) has been found to be extremely successful in the treatment of chronic migraine suffers. This therapy is used in adults who report more than 15 headache days per month with headaches lasting four or more hours each day and have failed other conservative therapies. The therapy consists of a series of injections every 12 weeks. Botox has helped patient decrease the frequency of migraine headaches and the severity of the headache when it present. Ask a provider if you are a candidate

Platelet Rich Plasma is used to stimulate a healing response in damaged tissues by using your own blood components. Any time you experience an injury or tissue damage, your body naturally recruits platelets and growth factors from your circulating blood to the site of the injury in order to begin the healing process. First, 60 cc of your own blood is drawn and a centrifugation device is used to concentrate the platelets and growth factors needed for healing and separate the components that are not needed. This concentration of cells is then delivered directly into your site of injury via injection. This allows for the same, natural healing response that occurs in the body to occur in a more powerful form. By jumpstarting the body’s natural healing process, you may experience faster healing and more thorough restoration of tissue to its natural and healthy state.

What conditions can be treated with PRP?

Chronic myofascial and joint pain

What can I expect during my treatment and after?

Depending on the type of injury, including its severity and duration, 1 to 3 injections are typically recommended. If multiple injections are required, they will be completed over the course of several weeks. You will get a list of pre and post procedure instructions, but you can expect that we will ask that you abstain from taking anti-inflammatory medications for two weeks pre-procedure and two weeks post-procedure. Soreness, stiffness and achiness at the site of injury are very common and a part of the healing process. Pain Management options will be discussed with you. Immediately following the injection, you may resume daily activities (such as work) and light exercise. We suggest that you refrain from strenuous activity and heavy lifting, particularly utilizing the injured body part, for a week post-procedure.